Hall of Fame

Paul Eisler PCB Fabrication Hall of Fame

Inducted 2018

 

Natsuo Sawa and Masahiro Hoda coinvented and patented a "method of rust preventing for copper and copper alloy." The scientists proposed surface-treating copper with a 2-alkylimidazole or an acid addition salt. Their invention, known today as OSP, or organic solderability protectant, is used on more than 60% of printed circuit boards worldwide.

Inducted May 2013

Charles Ducas was an American inventor and the first to describe etching and plated up conductors, as well as the precursors to multilayer circuit boards. In 1925, Ducas submitted a patent application for a method of creating an electrical path directly on an insulated surface by printing through a stencil with electrically conductive inks. This method is credited as the source of the term "printed wiring" or "printed circuit." In the patent, Ducas conceived forming grooves in a dielectric and filling them with conductive paste, then electroplating the paste. Conductive paste could also be printed, or stenciled onto dielectric and then electroplated. Both sides of the dielectric layer could be used for circuitry. Ducus made mention of the future of multilayer boards, stating: “Two or more panels may be positioned adjacent to each other... .” In another application, Ducas described electroplating a copper, silver or gold pattern onto a low temperature metal alloy through a contact mask, with heating applied to separate the conductor from the fusible bus plate and mask.

Inducted May 2013

Victor Dahlgren was among the first to fully describe and develop processes for printing and etching flat conductors on flexible base materials. It was a significant development because it allowed manufacturers to migrate from the more labor-intensive (and more expensive) wire harness. Indeed, Dahlgren was the originator of printed etched flexible cable used extensively in the NASA Apollo Space Program. Dahlgren (1923-2002), a mechanical engineer, joined Sanders Associates in 1952, during which time he received 18 patents. In 1963 he co-founded Electro Mechanisms (later Teledyne Electro Mechanisms), and in 1970 he cofounded TME Corp. (later Chomerics). He retired in 1988 from Lockheed Sanders after 20 years of service.

Inducted May 2013

Joseph (Joe) Fjelstad is one of the most prolific inventors the printed circuit industry has ever seen. At the time of his induction, Fjelstad had been credited with 170 patents, ranging from solderless flex circuit assembly to LED package assembly to "direct connect" signaling between the PCB and the component package. His inventions ranged from arrays to semiconductor packaging to flexible connectors. One patent describes a method for making a multilayer circuit. And describes method for deburring metal-clad laminate. A chemist by training who seamlessly migrated from printed circuit board fabrication to semiconductor packaging (with a short stint in the technical department of the IPC, an industry trade association), Fjelstad could probably be inducted into any of a variety of Halls of Fame.

 

 

 

Inducted May 2012

 

In 1903, Hanson described flat foil conductors laminated to an insulating board, in multiple layers, the precursor to the modern printed circuit. Designed circuits with conductors on both sides of the dielectric, and inserted access holes (vias) to connect the top and bottom conductive layers. Also envisioned future of electroplating and conductive ink.

 

 

 

 

Inducted May 2012

 

A Sandia Laboratories chemist, Jennings in 1976 published the landmark research that later became the guide (IPC-TP-333, "Voltage Clearance Recommendations for Printed Circuits") for current carrying capacity and dielectric breakdown in industry standards for the next 30 years. Jennings’ report described a series of tests to establish electrical properties. The results included voltage holdoff, current carrying capacity and insulation resistance for two-sided bare, coated, and encapsulated boards. Received the IPC Presidents Award in 1978.