January 2014 cover

 

FEATURES

SYSTEM DESIGN
Multi-Fabric Planning for Efficient PCB Design
Traditional methodology for chip-package-board design has been a serial top-down flow where the chip drives package connectivity and, in turn, the package drives board connectivity. This approach worked when the largest device on a PCB was still well under 1,000 pins and the matrix was three to four rows deep. With more functional integration taking place at the chip- and package-level, package pin counts continue to grow to a point where several thousand pin packages will not be uncommon. Coordinated planning requires changes to methodology and tools and flows capable of delivering a simultaneous access to domain-specific data.
by Kevin Rinebold

STENCIL CLEANING
Reducing Stencil Wipe Frequency
Do nanocoatings really extend stencil underwipe intervals? As part of a stencil study, two nanocoated fine-grain stencils were evaluated using a complex test vehicle. The investigators expected a tenfold extension of wipe intervals would show a definite decline in print quality. The results were amazing – and unexpected.
by Chrys Shea and Ray Whittier

Facts About OSHA’s New Hazard Communication Standards and GHS
How the Global Harmonized System (GHS) impacts US, Mexico and Canada.
by Lindsey Shehan and Kevin Pawlowski

 

FIRST PERSON

 

MONEY MATTERS

 

TECH TALK

January 2014 cover

 

FEATURES

OPTICAL INTERCONNECTS
Polymer Waveguide Silicones for High Bandwidth Applications
System assembly using polymer waveguides can potentially be much lower in terms of cost and complexity, while also offering significantly higher bandwidth density. Best of all, they can be manufactured using conventional PCB methods.
by Simon B. Jones

PRODUCTRONICA RECAP
Big and Small in Munich
It’s nearly impossible to summarize the aggregate interest of 1,200 exhibitors and 38,000 attendees. But 03015 components would certainly be a start. A review of the industry's flagship trade show.
by Mike Buetow

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE
What is 'Reengineering?'
All the people who need to work together to produce a great product are in the same organization, receiving the same marching orders from the same boss, and are—ideally—in the same room. So how come this doesn't always lead to a smoother, faster product delivery that better satisfies the customer’s needs?
by Bob Kotcher

 

FIRST PERSON

 

MONEY MATTERS

 

TECH TALK

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